Science of SKIN

THE EPIDERMIS


The epidermis is the outermost layer of your skin. It’s made up of millions of skin cells held together by lipids. This creates a resilient barrier and regulates the amount of water released from your body. This layer also continuously sheds dead skin cells as new, healthier cells are generated in the lower layers of the epidermis. This process is known as cellular turnover.

The Stratum Corneum

The Stratum Corneum is the top layer of the epidermis, made of dead skin cells in brick-like layers. Between the skin cells are lipids acting as mortar. The lipids are made up of ceramides, cholesterols and fatty acids.


The Stratum Granulosum

is where keratinocytes form your water-proof, protective barrier.


The Stratum Spinosum

is a protecting layer where Langerhans, immune response repairing cells. are produced.


The Stratum Basale

Stratum Germinativum is the bottom layer of the Epidermis. This is the layer where new cells divide, pushing old cells upward. Here also Melanocytes are responsible for the production of melanin (skin pigment color).


THE DERMIS


The dermis located beneath the Epidermis and is where you can find hair roots, nerve endings, blood vessels, and sweat glands that help regulate body temperature and remove waste products. The dermis also contains oil (sebum) glands that keep your skin lubricated, which prevents drying and cracking and helps waterproofing.

The Dermis consists of two layers:

The Papillary layer

The Papillary layer, the uppermost layer, is directly beneath the Epidermis. This is where connective tissue resides that help supply blood and nutrients to the epidermis.


The Reticular layer or Dermis

The Reticular layer or Dermis is where collagen and elastin fibers are produced. This is what gives skin its strength and elasticity. This is also where fat cells are located, which provide cushion to the skin.


THE HYPODERMIS


The Hypodermis, or subcutaneous layer is just below the Dermis and is the thickest layer of the skin. It contains the connective tissue that attaches the dermis to your muscles and bones and it’s where body temperature is regulated. It's also where nerve and blood vessels are insulated, providing a fatty layer that keeps the rest of your body protected.

Learn about the Science of AGING that can help with many of these concerns

THE EPIDERMIS


The epidermis is the outermost layer of your skin. It’s made up of millions of skin cells held together by lipids. This creates a resilient barrier and regulates the amount of water released from your body. This layer also continuously sheds dead skin cells as new, healthier cells are generated in the lower layers of the epidermis. This process is known as cellular turnover.

The Stratum Corneum

The Stratum Corneum is the top layer of the epidermis, made of dead skin cells in brick-like layers. Between the skin cells are lipids acting as mortar. The lipids are made up of ceramides, cholesterols and fatty acids.


The Stratum Granulosum

is where keratinocytes form your water-proof, protective barrier.


The Stratum Spinosum

is a protecting layer where Langerhans, immune response repairing cells. are produced.


The Stratum Basale

Stratum Germinativum is the bottom layer of the Epidermis. This is the layer where new cells divide, pushing old cells upward. Here also Melanocytes are responsible for the production of melanin (skin pigment color).


THE DERMIS


The dermis located beneath the Epidermis and is where you can find hair roots, nerve endings, blood vessels, and sweat glands that help regulate body temperature and remove waste products. The dermis also contains oil (sebum) glands that keep your skin lubricated, which prevents drying and cracking and helps waterproofing.

The Dermis consists of two layers:

The Papillary layer

The Papillary layer, the uppermost layer, is directly beneath the Epidermis. This is where connective tissue resides that help supply blood and nutrients to the epidermis.


The Reticular layer or Dermis

The Reticular layer or Dermis is where collagen and elastin fibers are produced. This is what gives skin its strength and elasticity. This is also where fat cells are located, which provide cushion to the skin.


THE HYPODERMIS


The Hypodermis, or subcutaneous layer is just below the Dermis and is the thickest layer of the skin. It contains the connective tissue that attaches the dermis to your muscles and bones and it’s where body temperature is regulated. It's also where nerve and blood vessels are insulated, providing a fatty layer that keeps the rest of your body protected.

Learn about the Science of AGING that can help with many of these concerns